GV Design Sprint

Personal Project

GalleryPal

Gallery Guide Mobile App

Introduction

GalleryPal is a startup that design a way to improve the experience of viewing art for gallery or museum visitors. However, they saw a lot of discussion around getting quick information while looking at the art that will give viewers a better appreciation for art pieces and artists. They’ve decided to create a mobile app solution. To come up with an app that fit user’s needs, I followed the Google Ventures design sprint process, a five-day process for answering critical business questions through design, prototyping, and testing ideas with customers. The result is the minimum viable product (MVP). This was a solo sprint. My role was to act as a UX researcher, product designer, interaction designer, information architect, and strategist.

Problem

Solution

Need quick and easy information of artworks or exhibitions while viewing arts.

Below are the screens of the user flow. After mapping the problem, a lightening demo, Crazy 8s, sketching, storyboarding, prototyping and usability testing, this is what I came up with. The solution prioritizes quick information of artworks or artists in order of current exhibition, past exhibition, artists, medium, technic, and fun facts that a customer would need about. In thinking about the business use case and why people might use for this app, instead of using Google differentiating factors are the attention to the needs of quick satisfied information of artworks at the moment of viewing art in galleries or museums.

My Process

Day 1 - Map

Day 1 of the GV design sprint is to understand the problem and map out the customer’s experience. GalleryPal tries to increase customer satisfaction of when viewing art. Users are primarily interested in quick guide of art. GalleryPal wants to make it easier for these visitors to find information or resonated stories about an artist and art works. I’ve been brought in to complete a design sprint for a mobile app solution. 

Users have specifically asked for the following: 

  • Quick guide

  • Highlighted information

  • Background information or context

  • Want to full satisfaction without something missing feeling

  • Learn facts alone instead of group tours

  • Want to know Artist’s intention of creation.

  • Process and Technique

  • Artists’ testimonial of their arts

My Process

Day 1 - Map

Day 1 of the GV design sprint is to understand the problem and map out the customer’s experience. GalleryPal tries to increase customer satisfaction of when viewing art. Users are primarily interested in quick guide of art. GalleryPal wants to make it easier for these visitors to find information or resonated stories about an artist and art works. I’ve been brought in to complete a design sprint for a mobile app solution. 

Users have specifically asked for the following: 

  • Quick guide

  • Highlighted information

  • Background information or context

  • Want to full satisfaction without something missing feeling

  • Learn facts alone instead of group tours

  • Want to know Artist’s intention of creation.

  • Process and Technique

  • Artists’ testimonial of their arts

This is a common problem that I can relate to. Although I majored in art, there were many limitations in appreciating the art of the museum. When I went to the museum, I had many questions about my work, but it was not always solved. I did some research before going to the museum, but not always. In order to fully enjoy the exhibits, it is much more helpful to have background information, so galleries and museums use information to convey information through a docent. However, the limitation of knowledge acquisition through a docent has time limitation and language barriers. When I first came to the United States, it was hard to understand the explanation in English. If I had an easy, fast and intuitive information guide app in my hand, I would be able to enjoy a much richer appreciation without help from others.  I can see the demand for this app. This made me really excited to tackle this problem and create a reliable solution.

The persona for GalleryPal is Angela, a 32 year old junior art director living in New York, NY. Since moving to New York a year ago, Angela has tried to take advantage of all the world class art and museum in the city. She gets frustrated if she knew little more, she would have a better experience while her viewing art. She wants to get quick information while looking at the art that will give her better appreciation for it, and make her feel like she is making the most out of her visit. 

 

Below is a map of the user’s actions. I started with the persona, Angela, listed on the left. Next, I skipped the ending, with her completed goal on the right. Then, I filled out a flowchart of everything that happens as the customer interacts with the product. 

Day 2 - Sketch

Day 2 focuses on solutions. I started by doing a lightening demo, which means examining what kinds of solutions already exist. Next, I did two sketches, the first is a technique called Crazy 8s and the second is a solution sketch. 

LIGHTNING DEMO

There are not many museums that connect workers to visitors, however I did find a few options. Many galleries and museums have an introduction to themselves and exhibits, but few provides kindly information about art works. I chose the most popular museums and analyse them. Below are the companies I took inspiration from and the types of features they offered. Aside from these directly related companies, I also explored apps where a key part of the experience was using a search bar and audio guide, such as the Whitney Museum and the Met Museum.

Whitney Museum

Menu categories, Artists introduction, Audio guide

Metropolitan Museum

Search filters, format showing artworks, order of content

CRAZY 8S SKETCH EXERCISE

The Crazy 8s exercise is a core design sprint method. The idea is sketched out as a way to ideate and generate possible solutions. I selected the most critical screen for this exercise: when a user wants to see information related to the current exhibition on site. This was chosen as the crucial screen because it’s where the user will complete the primary activity in the app. They want to use the app at the moment while they are viewing art at galleries or museums. I focused on which features will help users’ frustrations. 

Solution Sketch

Following the Crazy 8s exercise, I selected a screen that I liked best based on functionality and design, which you can see below. Using this, I created a solution sketch. It includes the screen that comes before the critical screen, the critical screen itself, and the following screen.

 Solution Sketch 

Day 3 focused on storyboard. The storyboard starts with persona, Angela, looking at a quick guide mobile app while her viewing art at galleries or museums. She goes to GalleryPal, logs in, and searches artists or art pieces by using the searching option. She taps on painting and checks information about an artist, medium, techniques, an artist's intention, fun facts, and reasons why it is famous. After her session, she gets a map of where the actual painting located.

 Day 4 - Prototype 

Day 4 of the GV sprint is to build a prototype of the user flow to test with remote workers. 

The screens mimic the order of the user flow as follows: log in, discover page, search artists or art works, check searching results and view map. After getting components where I wanted, I went back through each screen paying more attention to details such as spacing, alignment, adding images, adding icons and adding details that help tell the story of the app.  

I also made sure items in Sketch were grouped appropriately. 

I downloaded the icons from the Noun Project. Branding and UI concepts were referenced in CollectUI and Images came from Unsplash and google image.  

My goal for usability testing is that everything makes sense to users. The only concern I have is on the balance between style and usability. To be consistent with branding and design, I used the light orange brown colors and orange colors in certain places for point.  It’s also hard to account for items that may be outside the realm of this user flow. As long as I explain the concept properly during testing, this shouldn’t be an issue. 

 Day 5 - Usability Test 

Now that I have my prototype, I need to do some usability testing to see how potential customers interact with my prototype. To help guide the interaction, I’ve created tasks and debrief questions. I interviewed 5 potential customers, which according to Nielsen Norman is the ideal number of tests, due to the diminishing returns after 5. I started by thanking them for participating, followed by an intro to the concept, general info around the prototype, then launch into the tasks and debrief questions. Each interview was slightly different because the feedback is different. I try to go with the flow and explore further when necessary. 

Tasks

  • What do you want to click on the first page?

  • What do you think what is this app for? What’s your first impression of this app?

  • Can you find information about an artist or artwork of current exhibition? 

  • Is Highlighted information format enough to enjoy your viewing art experience? 

 

Debrief

  • What do you think of the app?

  • What do you think could be improved? 

  • What did you like about the app?

 Findings 

The interviews went really well. I spent the day running around to four in person interviews and one remote interview. Most of participants like quick highlighted information with image swipe. It made me happy that people were excited about the app and the design. Several people mentioned that they loved the concept and that they would use it. They also shared their own struggles with viewing art with limited background knowledge, Once I completed all five tests, I went back to my work station and started reading through my notes to find patterns. I was able to uncover quite a few ways to improve the app. I documented these in a table, similar to the one below, listing out the issue, solution and the priority level. To determine priority level, I really just used common sense and instinct. Next, I went back to the design and made the updates by priority level. These updates result in the solution screens seen above.

 Learnings 

I completed the design sprint over the standard 5 day period. This process was completely different from the previous three month project I did creating a wealth management app. I had a lot of fun and discovered new techniques for ideation. I was also forced to design a prototype in one day, which led me to be creative in picking apart icons from the Noun Project or taking items from design kits. I admittedly worked on the prototype for almost the whole day, instead of the 5 hours suggested in the Design Sprint method. At this point, I have also done quite a few usability tests and was able to focus on refinement of my techniques. 

  • What a design sprint is and how to execute

  • Crazy 8s method to force yourself to sketch quickly and loosely to come up with ideas

  • How to storyboard (I initially thought storyboarding was a sketch of each screen as opposed to trying to capture the user’s actions)

  • Giving neutral responses when interviewing such as “uh-huh,” instead of “good” or “perfect” 

  • Digging deeper in interviews and getting people to talk. Using techniques such as silence or “anything else?”

  • Exploring the use of subtle shadows and gradients

keuh11@icloud.com​

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